Nurturing the five senses—sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch—from a young age helps children make observations and learn about the world around them. However, these five senses aren’t the only senses teachers should be focusing on helping children develop. In (Almost) Everything You Need to Know About Early Childhood Education, Judy Fujawa shares the following list of senses that need nurturing:   

  • Sense of humor – Everyone needs to be able to laugh, especially at themselves.
  • Sense of direction – Knowing how to find your way is more important than you think.
  • Sense of right and wrong – Helping children develop their moral compass can keep them safe and out of serious trouble as they grow up.
  • Sense of accomplishment – A sense of accomplishment for what they’ve learned and achieved in the classroom will encourage children to continue to learn and grow.
  • Sense of pride – A sense of pride in their skills and abilities helps children develop self-esteem and self-respect.
  • Sense of inner peace – Nurturing children’s sense of inner peace helps children develop social-emotional skills and cuts down on challenging behaviors.
  • Sense of physical well-being – A sense of physical well-being helps children feel safe, healthy, and happy.
  • Sense of creativity – Think of what could be accomplished if more people had a sense of creativity.
  • Sense of positive self-image – A positive self-image can change a child’s life.
  • Sense of wonder – A sense of wonder is required to see and embrace the more magical things in life. 

Fujawa states that it’s also important for teachers to nurture and model common sense to help ensure children have the ability to make sound decisions. Nurturing all of these senses supports the growth and development of the whole child and helps children develop some of the social-emotional skills they need to be happy and successful at any age.